Category: book reviews

The Lights in the Tunnel

Ford’s book, The Lights in the Tunnel, is a bleak look at the future of global economies given an accelerating pace of automation. The book’s key idea is both clear and frightening: “The central thesis of this book is that, as technology accelerates, machine automation may ultimately penetrate the economy to the extent that wages no …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2016/02/martin-ford-the-lights-in-the-tunnel/

Security, fear and Stuxnet

Roman Poroshyn’s brief book (156 pages) provides an excellent overview of Stuxnet within the larger context of cyber-warfare and espionage in the Middle East. Unlike another book on the same topic, Kim Zetter’s Countdown to Zero, it is not based on extensive interviews, nor does it focus in as great a depth upon the process …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2016/02/book-review-of-stuxnet/

Book Review of Lords of Secrecy

Scott Horton’s book Lords of Secrecy is a passionate, angry, well-written and disturbing look at how U.S. national security agencies have undermined congressional oversight, and consistently violated the law. At the core, this book argues that the growth of the national security bureaucracy has outgrown the ability of Congress to provide oversight, and fundamentally threatens democracy. …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/12/book-review-of-lords-of-secrecy/

A Book Review of Smarter than Us

Stuart Armstrong’s Smarter than Us is an exceptionally brief book of barely 54 pages, including the bibliography. It is not based on fieldwork, the references are few, and it can be easily read in two hours. The entire work reads as a series of thought experiments regarding the future of artificial intelligence (AI). It is …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/11/a-book-review-of-smarter-than-us/

In honor of Halloween: A Book Review of Haunted Girl

Every Halloween I look at an international mystery or folklore. This year, I’ll review a book by Laurie Glenn Norris and Barbara Thompson titled Haunted Girl: Esther Cox and the Great Amherst Mystery. The book examines events surrounding one of the most famous poltergeist cases in Canadian history, which took place from 1878 to 1879. As …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/10/in-honor-of-halloween-a-book-review-of-haunted-girl/