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Apr 15

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Syllabus for an online course on Digital Globalization

This winter quarter I taught a fully-online class on Digital Globalization, which I greatly enjoyed. I believe that Digital Globalization is a form of globalization that is every bit as powerful as economic, political and cultural globalization. Of course, it is also inextricably linked to all these other forms of globalization. It’s strange, therefore, that has remained largely invisible in the literature in the field.

One point that struck me from the class is that the media gives a great deal of attention to the question of surveillance by governments, but my students are every bit as concerned about surveillance by corporations such as Facebook. I had also assumed that my students would be digital natives. Many of them, however, felt a great digital gap between themselves and younger siblings, who spend a great deal of time on social media, such as Instagram and Snapchat. They appreciated the chance to learn about topics such as Bitcoin that they had heard about in the media, but knew little about. From my students, I learned that there was a Bitcoin ATM in Portland, as well as bars and apartment buildings that accepted Bitcoin.

A few notes about the syllabus that follows. The majority of the content, including almost all of the videos, were obtained from my library’s Streaming Video and Music database. For this reason, I haven’t included the links here, because they would only work for people with accounts at my university. As you can see, I’m also beginning to use modules for online courses. In this particular case, I began with two weeks focusing on the individual (social media, the generation gap, music and art); two weeks focusing on institutions and the economy (Uber, Airbnb, the sharing economy, Bitcoin, 3D printers); and two weeks focused on the nation-state level (surveillance, privacy, encryption). For the fourth module of the course, students do three weeks of independent study on of the topics that they’ve explored in the class, to answer a key question. The goal of this module is to develop learner agency.

The final week of the course content students share a digital artifact, which is typically a Google Slideshow. I’ve done this in previous online classes, and it’s always very popular with the students, who take a great deal of pride in their work. I like the assignment because it in a sense it creates a co-constructed syllabus, in which students are responsible for their own learning. Lastly, for multiple reasons I did not allow students to do any research for this course on the Dark Web; that is, they could not research in areas of the Web that they could only access via a TOR, ITP or Freenet browser.

Shawn Smallman, 2016

Digital Globalization

INTL 399

A fully online class

Winter 2015

 

Professor Smallman

Rm. 345, East Hall

Phone: 725-9978

E-mail: drss@pdx.edu

 

Office hours: Wednesday, 9-11am, in person, via Skype or Google Chat/Hangout.

 

Description: This course will explore how digital globalization has impacted all aspects of global society. The course will begin by examining the individual and digital culture, and an exploration of the psychological and political impact of digital life and social media globally. The course will then look at institutions, such as corporations, universities, and the media, and how they are impacted by digital globalization. In this section, we will examine the Sharing Economy in a global impact, in particular the impact of cyber currencies such as Bitcoin. Lastly, the course will examine security issues, such as crime, hacking, privacy, surveillance, and Carrington events.

Note: students will choose which of the three major themes they wish to focus on in the final section of the course, depending on their interests.

Student Learning Outcomes: The students in this class will:

  1. Reflect on how digital globalization impacts them personally, as well as the cultural world in which they live.
  2. Demonstrate their understanding of how digital globalization impacts politics and economics on a global scale.
  3. Provide evidence that they can think critically about ethical issues related to globalization.
  4. Create a digital artifact related to a key course theme, such as a Slideshow.

Class Format and Requirements:

There are no regular class sessions for online classes. Instead, the course is organized around the weekly class activities, such as the Discussion Boards. These activities will be evaluated based on the students’ ability to demonstrate they have completed the assigned readings and videos. It is essential, therefore, that students complete reading assignments prior to partaking in the online discussions. In general, students should plan on spending about eight hours a week dedicated to course readings and participation in the weekly activities and assignments. This is equivalent to the time requirements for the face-to-face version of the class. Students who do not access D2L or post by the second week will be dropped from the class.

Expectations for Online Students

The online format requires personal discipline to succeed. Time management is a major factor in online success. Students should follow these basic rules:

  1. Block out time for your online class.
  2. Set your personal weekly times for “attending” your online class, just like when you attend a campus class.
  3. You should reserve the time that you would budget both to attend a regular format class, plus study time.
  4. ALWAYS, start on your work early in case of a computer problem; don’t wait until the last moment.
  5. Please let the Professor know if you have any questions or issues. Communications is very important in an online class.

Accessing D2L:

To access D2L, go to the d2l.pdx.edu. To login, enter your odin ID and your odin password. If you do not have an odin account, or are not sure what your odin ID or password is, go to https://www.account.pdx.edu/ or contact the Information Technology Help Desk (help@pdx.edu) or 725-HELP. For D2L help in person, please go to the OIT help desk in the basement between Smith and Cramer Hall. All assignments will be submitted in D2L.

Communication with the Faculty Member

Please e-mail me directly rather than through D2L. Please feel free to contact me for further clarification of the assignments, if you have questions about the materials, or if you have personal concerns that will affect your academic performance. I make every effort to respond to email in 48 hours. If you have lengthy or complex questions, we can arrange to talk in person, by Google Chat or Google Hangout.

Reading:

 

There are no books or other materials to purchase for the class. All the assigned course materials are available as embedded links in D2L, as well as the course syllabus. Because most course materials are accessed through the PSU library, you will need to have your ODIN user ID and password.

 

Basis for Grade: note that this course must be taken for a grade.

 

Please note that there is no final exam in this course.

Reading and Video Responses (40% of the final grade; 10 points for each response, for a total of 40 points): Students will submit a two to four page response to Dropbox after they complete each major course module (weeks 2, 4, 6 and 9) Each response will briefly discuss the strengths and weaknesses of three videos and three readings within the module. Students should discuss the material that they believe was the most significant to them for each particular module. At the end of the response, they should explain why they chose these particular works. Please remember, that you will be expected to read or view all content in each module, even though you will only discuss six works in your response.

Please be certain to save the document before submitting it. It is your responsibility to confirm that your response was submitted, and to check your grades regularly throughout the course.

On-line Discussion (30% of the final grade; 30 points total): Every Monday I will post a question to the discussion board. The goal of this is to facilitate an academic community that engages in an online conversation. The class will be divided into small discussion groups of five to six students. Every week you will have to respond to my post by Wednesday at 11:59pm (150-200 words), and to another student’s post (100-150 words) by Friday at 11:59pm. While I will provide a question to start the conversation, students are also allowed to post on another question that interests them, to raise an issue for the reading, or to share related material to the class. In addition, some weeks students will share material related to their final slideshow project.

Students are expected to demonstrate, at all times, academic integrity and respect for others. Posts that do not meet this standard will not be given any credit, and will impact a student’s overall discussion grade. Personal insults and profanity will not only result in an automatic “zero” for that week’s post, but also –in serious cases- may result in a failing grade for the discussion grade.

There will also be a Question and Answer page on the discussion board, where students can post questions or comments to be viewed by both the class and the instructor.

Digital Slideshow or Video Project (30% of the final grade; 30 points): Due Sunday by 11:59pm of week nine

Students will produce a slideshow using either Google Slides, which is available in their Google account, or the free app Microsoft Sway. The slideshow should explore some aspect of digital globalization in depth. Students do not need to worry if another student chooses the same topic; it is inevitable that the same genre or event will interest more than one person in the class.

With the instructor’s permission, students may also create another digital artifact for the course, such as a Youtube video. Whatever they create, however, they must be able to share with the class by means of a stable URL. Students who choose this option can either work individually or as a group.

One goal of this project is to create an online community, even though it is an individual project. For this reason, students will share the work and give feedback by posting materials in their discussion groups by key dates outlined in the syllabus. By week eight students will have a draft roughed out and a link to share with a peer reviewer in their discussion group. At the end of week 9 students will share what they create with the class (through the group-share feature of the discussion board, where they will post the link for their slideshow), which will be the culmination of the course. The presentation must be posted by 11:59pm on Sunday of week nine in the class. More details on the slideshow project are provided at the end of this syllabus.

Note: Students may NOT do research for this project in the Dark Web (anything that would require a TOR, ITP or Freenet browser to access). Violation of this rule entails an automatic O for this assignment.

 

Please note that there is no final exam in this course. The coursework is completed at the end of week ten.

Late policy: late submissions of the Slideshow project will be penalized (except in the case of verifiable illness or family emergency) five percent a day for each day that they are late (including weekends) up to a maximum of thirty percent of the final grade. Late discussion posts are not accepted (except at the discretion of the instructor) because these are a form of conversation, which require an audience to have value. The reading responses will only be accepted after the due date after communication with the Professor.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism:

Academic integrity is essential to learning, especially in an online setting. Plagiarism is the submission of another person’s work as your own, such as by having someone else write your reading response, discussion post, or Slideshow project. It is also a serious academic crime. Any instance of plagiarism will result in an automatic “O” for that assignment, for both the person who submitted the assignment, and the person who helped them. The student(s) may also be referred to the Dean of Students.

In an online class, it is important to ensure that students are submitting their own work. Some students will be chosen at random to have a brief discussion (via Google Hangout or phone) about their work during the quarter, to confirm their authorship.

Disability: Any student who has a disability that may require some special arrangements in order to fulfill the course requirements should contact the Disability Resource Center at the start of the course to make appropriate arrangements. The DRC is located in 116 Smith Memorial Student Union, and their phone number is (503) 725-4150.

Topics: True academic inquiry must follow its own course. For this reason, there may be changes and additions to the schedule that follows.

Please note that some videos are easier to view on computers than on tablets. If you leave town for a weekend, you may want to check that the assigned movies play on your tablet before you leave, or to bring a laptop. You will need to sign in with your Odin ID before watching the movies.

Please let Professor Smallman know if a link is broken. You can, however, also click on the links in the syllabus for most course content. There are also instructions in course content for how to look up class videos at the library main webpage.

Themes and Modules:

 

All students will cover the same content for the first six weeks. In weeks seven through nine, students will focus on individual research, which they will share with their classmates in their small group discussions. At the end of every module, students will submit a video and reading response in Dropbox. In week ten, the class will come together so that everyone can view the classes’ slideshow projects.

Module One, the Individual and Digital Culture

Week 1: Youth Culture and Creativity

Watch:

 

PressPausePlay: The Digital Revolution and the Changing Creative Landscape, 2011

 

CyberSenior

 

Generation Like, Frontline.

 

TEDTalks: Del Harvey- Protecting Twitter Users, Sometimes from Themselves

 

Read:

Andrew Butler, Cyberpunk

  1. 7-28, 71-86. Do NOT read the entire book.

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Begin to think about a possible topic for your final slideshow project, and the platform that you would like to use for it. If in doubt, please use Google Slides. Everyone in the class already has access to Google Slides through their ODIN account.

 

Week Two: Mobile Phones, Social Media and Politics

 

Watch:

 

Tunisia and Egypt: How Facebook Changed the World: the Arab Spring

 

Libya and Bahrain: How Facebook Changed the World: the Arab Spring

 

Ted Talks: You Don’t Need an App for that (about innovation in Africa)

 

Connecting People: the Human Cost of Mobile Phones

 

Read:

Why a Mobile Phone Revolution needs teachers (German source, focus on Africa)

 

Media, Politics and the Digital Age

 

Internet Use on Mobile Phones in Africa

 

Hossein Derakhshan, “Iran’s Blogfather,” The Guardian, December 29, 2015

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Please submit your Video and Reading Response for module one by 11:59pm on Thursday.

 

You should also select a topic and platform for your final project. You can always change your mind later.

 

Module Two: Institutions and Transformation

 

Week Three: The Sharing Economy, Uber and AirBnB

 

The Sharing Economy and Regulation:

 

Watch:

TEDTalks: Jeremy Heimans- What new power looks like

 

Gun Activist Cody Wilson on 3-D Printed Guns

 

Read:

 

Romain Dillet, “Uber France Leaders Arrested for Running Illegal Taxi Company,”

 

NYT, Courtney Love and Uber Protest

 

Associated Press, “A look at Challenges Uber has Faced Around the World.”

 

Karla Adam, “The Rise of Uber means less love for London’s Black Cabs,” Washington Post, December 31, 2015.

Feeney, Matthew, and Rideshare companies Uber. “Is Ridesharing Safe?.”Cato Policy Analysis (2015).

 

Zervas, G., Proserpio, D., & Byers, J. (2015). A First Look at Online Reputation on Airbnb, Where Every Stay is Above Average. Where Every Stay is Above Average (January 23, 2015).

 

Sperling, Gene. “How Airbnb Combats Middle Class Income Stagnation.” (2015).

 

Rogers, Brishen. “Social Costs of Uber, The.” U. Chi. L. Rev. Dialogue 82 (2015): 85.

 

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Begin to work on your proposal for your Slideshow Projects, which you will share with your discussion group next week. Your proposal should include your topic, a brief outline of the presentation, and the learning outcomes, which are what you want your audience to learn.

 

Week Four: Currency, Bitcoin and Utopia

 

Watch:

Cybertopia: Dreams of Silicon Valley. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2014. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

TEDTalks: Paul Kemp-Robertson—Bitcoin. Sweat. Tide. Meet the Future of Branded Currency. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2013. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

TEDTalks: Rachel Botsman- The Currency of the New Economy is Trust

 

Trailer, “The Rise and Fall of Bitcoin.”

 

Investor and Author George Gilder on Bitcoin. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2014. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

Read:

McCallum, Bennett T. “Bitcoin Issues.” (2014).

 

Villar, Ruairidh, Sophie Knight, and Brett Wolf. “Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox Goes Dark in Blow to Virtual Currency.” (2014).

 

Andy Greenberg and Gwern Branwen, “Bitcoin’s Creator Satoshi Nakamoto is probably this Unknown Australian Genius,” Wired. December 8, 2015.

 

Do:

 

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Please submit your Video and Reading Response for module one by 11:59pm on Thursday.

 

This week in your discussion group you will share a brief proposal for your slideshow project, rather than responding to a question on the course content. Your proposal should include your topic, a brief outline of the presentation, and the learning outcomes, which are what you want your audience to learn. Please give constructive feedback to at least one other student’s proposal in your small discussion group.

 

Module Three: Nation-states: Espionage, Privacy and the Dark Web

 

Week 5: Privacy, Espionage and Intelligence Agencies

 

Watch:

Wikileaks, Secrets and Lies

 

Erasing David: Surveillance vs. Privacy in the 21st– Century Data State

 

TEDTalks: Christopher Soghoian- Government Surveillance, this is just the beginning.

 

TEDTalks: Edward Snowden- Here is how we take back the internet

 

TEDTalks: Richard Ledgett, the NSA responds to Edward Snowden’s TED Talk

1

 

BBC: Will tomorrow’s homes help hackers spy on us?:

 

Read:

 

Wikileaks

 

“Ali app lets smartphones record, video, audio, location 24/7”

 

Anvinh Doanvo, “Tactless courtship- NSA’s espionage in France,”

 

Mel Gurtov, Blog: the Human Interest, “Post #94: Manipulating Reality: Facebook is listening to you. ”

 

Do:

 

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Please upload a draft of your bibliography into Dropbox.

 

Week 6: The Dark Web, Silk Road, and Hacking

 

Watch:

 

Zero Days: White Hat and Black Hat Hackers. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2014. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

Inside the Dark Web. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2014. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

In Search Of The Most Dangerous Town On The Internet. Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 2015. Web. 1 Sept. 2015.

 

60 minutes, the Dark Web, 15 minutes: use this link:

 

Wes Spencer, Online lecture: “The Silk Road: the Rise and Fall of the World’s Largest Online Black Market.” Youtube, October 11, 2013.

 

Silk Road: Wired journalist talking about writing a series.

 

“Darkode,” Radio Lab. There is no transcript for this podcast.

 

National Geographic: What if the biggest solar storm on record happened today?

 

Read:

Cicada 3301

 

Van Buskirk, J., Roxburgh, A., Farrell, M., & Burns, L. (2014). The closure of the Silk Road: what has this meant for online drug trading?. Addiction109(4), 517-518.

 

David Glance, “What is the Dark Web.”

 

BBC: DARPA creates Dark web search engine:

 

Wired article, part one, “The Rise and Fall of the Silk Road.”

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Please submit your Video and Reading Response for module 3 by 11:59pm on Thursday.

 

Work on your Slideshow. You should begin to build your presentation in Google Slides by creating five slides plus the bibliography by the end of the week. Your first slide should interest the reader by raising compelling questions.

 

Individual Exploration of a course topic:

 

Students will choose to focus on ONE of the three themes above in weeks seven through nine, so that students can explore a topic in greater depth. The goal of this work is to develop your critical thinking skills, by having you identify the main issue on a topic (which should be related to one of the three themes), to obtain evidence and examples, and then to draw a conclusion and make recommendations. You are also required to demonstrate your information literacy skills, by locating and viewing material related to your theme from the PSU library and other sources. You will be discussing your work in your small discussion groups the same as you have earlier in the course.

Note, the theme that you choose to explore will probably connect to your topic in your final Digital Project, but this is not required:

 

Week 7, Identifying the Main Issues:

This week will students will read, view or listen to five sources on a topic related to a major theme in the course. At least two of these sources must be peer reviewed articles. The goal is to identify what –for you- is the major issue or question that you want explore with this topic. This topic will likely be related to your Slideshow project, but it does not have to be.

 

Remember: Students may NOT do research for this project in the Dark Web (anything that would require a TOR or similar browser to access).

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

 

Complete your rough draft for the Slideshow Project. At the end of your first discussion post this week please include a brief message that describes how your work is progressing.

 

Week 8, Obtaining Examples and Evidence:

This week you will further investigate your topic by doing further research. You will again draw on five resources, which may include interviews or emails with experts in the area. At least one of these sources must be a peer-reviewed article. The intent of this research is to strengthen your Slideshow project.

 

Do:

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59. This week you will share your draft slideshow project with other members of your discussion group by posting a link. You will then read and comment on other peoples’ projects. Please make comments on their work in a discussion post, rather than by using the “comments” feature inside Google Slides. You will not have another discussion question this week. The intent of this week’s discussion post is to have you work to improve each others’ projects.

 

Week 9, Drawing Conclusions and Forming Recommendations:

Imagine that you have been asked by the President or other leader to make recommendations regarding the topic you have investigated. In this week’s small group discussion post, you will describe your central conclusion and the recommendations that you would make.

 

Do:

Upload your project by Sunday at 11:59 pm before week ten.

 

Week 10: Viewing Digital Projects

View: the online presentations and materials for the Digital Project. You should view the ten projects that most interest you, whether slideshows or videos.

Do: upload a one to two paragraph reflection to Dropbox, in which you describe what you learned from working on the final assignment. Please also include a stable URL for your project (Google Slides, Sway, Youtube, etc).

 

Do your discussion post by Wednesday at 11:59, and respond to another student by Friday at 11:59.

The discussion question will focus on the Slideshow Projects.

There is no final exam in this course. Enjoy the Break!


 

 

Guidelines for the Slideshow Project

 

  • Your project should consider some aspect of Digital Globalization, and must refer to a global issue or topic.
  • The slideshow should begin with an introductory slide that interests the reader by raising compelling questions, or explains why this genre or artist is significant. Be sure to have your name on the opening slide.
  • The slideshow will be based on 10-15 sources, of which at least three must be academic articles. These are articles that have undergone a process called peer-review, and typically have citations. Many articles are available through the library’s electronic databases.
  • The slideshow must include a bibliography as its final slide.
  • Be careful to avoid plagiarism and to place all quotations between quotation marks.
  • You should demonstrate a good understanding of the content that you have read. You must show to the viewer that you have incorporated information from multiple sources. You will evaluate different points of view and synthesize information.
  • The slideshow should be well written, with no grammar or spelling errors. It should also be clearly organized so that one point flows from the next.
  • The slideshow should be visually appealing. The choice of font and graphics should be appropriate to an academic work, and should complement the material, without distracting the viewer. The font sizes should be easy to read.
  • Embedded videos have been popular with other students in the past, but they are not required.
  • The slideshow should have 15-16 slides. This is a suggested length and more is OK.
  • All work must be original. Some students will be chosen at random from the class to have a discussion about their work, to confirm their authorship.

 

Key Steps for the Slideshow Project

 

  1. Students should choose what tool they wish to use to create their slideshow. They can use Google Slides from their Google drive (accessible through their ODIN account), or they can use a free app Microsoft Sway. In the latter case, students will have to create a Microsoft account, if they do not already have one. Students who do not have a lot of technological experience should choose Google Slides, which has good user support on campus. Students have also always had a good experience using Google Slides. The advantage of Microsoft Sway is that it can create more visually attractive and design-savvy slideshows. Microsoft has Youtube tutorials on Sway, which give a good sense of how it works. Students might wish to try both to see which they prefer.

 

  1. By week eight students should have a template roughed out and a link to share with a peer reviewer in their discussion group. If you are using Google Slides remember to set the sharing to “Share with anyone with a PDX email.”

 

  1. When it’s time to share their final project with their discussion group, students should make comments on their peer’s final project on the Discussion Board, rather than the “comment” feature in Google Slides.

 

  1. When it’s time to share their work with the entire class students will use the Week 10 Group Share to post their name and the link for their slideshow.  (e.g. “Vince’s Final Presentation and Link”).  We will be discussing guidelines for reviewing and commenting on others’ projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed Timeline for the Slideshow Project

 

Week One: Research a possible topic for the Slideshow Project.

 

Week Two: Select Topic. Choose which tool (Google Slideshow or Microsoft Sway) you wish to use to produce your Slideshow. It’s OK to change your mind later in the course, but that will add time to the project, so it is best to know which platform you wish to use. If in doubt, please use Google Slideshow, which has good user support on campus.

 

Week Three: Begin to work on your proposal for your Slideshow Projects. Your proposal should include your topic, a brief outline of the presentation, and the learning outcomes, which are what you want your audience to learn.

 

Week Four: Share your proposal with your discussion group. Comment on other peoples’ proposals.

 

Week Five: Create a bibliography of 8-10 sources for your project. Be sure that it is in a proper style, whether APA or Chicago Manual of Style. You will post this to Dropbox. Remember that your final bibliography must have 10-15 sources, so this is only the start of your work on the bibliography. At least three of your final sources must be academic articles. I will be reading and commenting on your bibliographies, but this assignment will not be graded, because it is designed to help you to build your final project.

 

Week Six: Work on your Slideshow. You should begin to build your presentation in Google Slides by creating five slides plus the bibliography by the end of the week. Your first slide should interest the reader by raising compelling questions. Everyone in the class already has access to Google Slides through their ODIN account.

 

Week Seven: Complete your rough draft for the Slideshow Project. In your second discussion post this week please include a brief message that describes how your work is progressing.

 

Week Eight: Share your Slideshow Project with other members of your discussion group by posting a link. Read and comment on other peoples’ projects. You can make comments on their work either by a discussion post, or by using the “comments” feature inside Google Slides. You will not have another discussion question this week.

 

Week Nine: Revise your Slideshow Project based on feedback from your discussion group. Be sure that you have used quotation marks for all quotes, and that all content otherwise is in your own words. Review for spelling and grammar errors. The slideshow should be clearly organized, so that one point flows from the next. Make sure that your slideshow is visually appealing. The choice of font and graphics should be appropriate to academic work. You should have 15-16 slides.

 

Week Ten: Everyone in the class will post the links for their final Project in the Group Share. Be sure to include a brief introduction describing the content of the slideshow prior to the link. Review and comment on 10 other students’ final projects on the discussion board.

 

 

 

 

Digital Globalization, Slideshow Rubric

 

Student Name: _______________________________________________

 

 

Content Writing and Organization Aesthetics
Excellent

The information presented demonstrates understanding and depth that is exceptionally relevant and insightful. The slideshow includes a well-done bibliography. The Slideshow is clearly based on careful research.

 

Excellent

The slideshow is well-organized, flows logically, and is a pleasure to read. There is a clear progression of ideas with supporting information. The assignment displays innovative ways to make the content clear and understandable.

 

Excellent

The presentation shows great skill in design aesthetics and tastefulness. The formatting is consistent throughout the slideshow. The photos and images are exceptionally well chosen and appropriate to the assignment.

 

 

Good

The information presented accurately and completely completes the topic. The bibliography is well-done.

 

Good

The slideshow is well organized and flows logically. The writing has some minor style or grammar issues.

Good.

The slideshow is generally thoughtfully done, although there may be one or two weaknesses.

Sufficient

Some information is presented, but there are gaps or errors. The bibliography has some minor mistakes or gaps.

 

Sufficient

The slideshow has some strengths, but sometimes could have been more tightly organized. There are problems with the writing, including grammar and spelling errors.

Sufficient

The presentation shows appropriate skill in designing with aesthetics in mind, despite some occasional weaknesses.

 

Needs Improvement

The informant is presented in a superficial manner. The bibliography includes too few sources, or has multiple formatting errors. Some of the information does not fit, or it is not clear how it is relevant.

Needs Improvement

The transition from one section to the next is not always clear. There are frequent grammar and spelling problems. The slideshow lacks a clear sense of purpose.

Needs Improvement

The slideshow demonstrates some attention to aesthetics, but has multiple significant issues.

Weak

The content does not have enough detail and integrity to inform the audience. The bibliography is missing or deeply flawed.

Weak

The slideshow lacks organization, and jumps from one topic to the next without any coherence. There are multiple and major grammar, spelling and style problems.

Weak

The slideshow does not show any effort regarding design or aesthetics.

 

Grading:

A = All excellent

A- = Mostly excellent

B/B+ = Mostly Good

C+/B- = Good with some sufficient

C or below = Mostly Sufficient to Needs Improvement

D or below= Mostly Weak or Needs Improvement

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2016/04/syllabus-for-an-online-course-on-digital-globalization/