Tag Archive: literature

Feb 15

Love, hate and novels

When I talk about globalization in my introductory class, it’s common for my students to think immediately of economic globalization, rather than other aspects such as cultural globalization. Yet to be a global citizen entails making connections between our worlds and that of others, and one of the best forms to do this is through …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2017/02/international-literature/

Aug 09

The art of Strange Things Done

I love mystery novels, and northern mysteries in particular. My sister, Ellen Wild, has a new book Strange Things Done coming out this September. The lead character of the novel is Jo Silver; after a body is found in the Yukon river, she is drawn into a mystery that leads her to fear for her own life. …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2016/08/strange-things-done/

Oct 14

David Groulx, Wabigoon River Poems

David Groulx is a poet of Indigenous and French-Canadian heritage who was raised in Elliot Lake, Ontario in Canada. His recent book of poetry, Wabigoon River Poems, has Canada’s Indigenous experience at its core, but places this history into a global context. A single poem can leap from Algeria to Vietnam, always within the context of a …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/10/david-groulx-wabigoon-river-poems/

Sep 01

Ghost Fleet: a book review

P.W. Singer and August Cole have written a techno-thriller based on a Chinese invasion of Hawaii, in a strange replay of Pearl Harbor. As with Tom Clancy’s work, there are multiple points of view, moral black and whites, and the technology is at times as much of a star as the main characters. Yet this …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/09/ghost-fleet-a-book-review/

May 25

Book review of Shigeru Mizuki’s Showa, 1926-1939

Shigeru Mizuki’s Showa: 1926-1939 is a graphic novel that intertwines two stories: 1) the chaotic history of Japan during the 1920s and 30s and 2) the author’s childhood during this same period. The author is remarkable in that he is now 91, but he has a vivid memory of his own childhood during this period. …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2015/05/book-review-of-shigeru-mizukis-showa-1926-1939/

Sep 17

Spies of the Balkans: A book review

We live in a time obsessed with spying. Wikileaks and Snowden have shown that non-state actors are now important actors in espionage, while also raising fundamental questions about the right to privacy. Now the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are talking about building their own undersea cable, in order to evade U.S. …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2014/09/spies-of-the-balkans-a-book-review/

May 28

Machado de Assis: A new translation by John Chasteen

One of my favorite ways to engage students in thinking about another part of the world is through literature. For this reason, I’ve been reading the short stories of Machado de Assis in John Charles Chasteen’s new translation, which is named after perhaps the author’s most famous short story, the Alienist. It’s often said that …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2014/05/machado-de-assis-a-new-translation-by-john-chasteen/

Oct 31

In Honor of Halloween: Japanese Books on the Supernatural

Last Halloween, I discussed my three favorite authors of ghost stories and the supernatural. This Halloween, I want to talk about works on folklore and the supernatural in Japan. Because folklore reflects the fears, ideas and beliefs of a society, it allows us to have insight into social issues difficult to access by other means. …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2013/10/in-honor-of-halloween-japanese-books-on-the-supernatural/

Jun 10

Cultural Globalization and Canada

I’ve recently been reading Michael Crummy’s Galore, which tells the story of generations of families (the Sellers and Devines) in a remote village, Paradise Deep, in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Newfoundland. The entire novel is characterized by bleak humor and beautiful language. It’s also not for those who might be scandalized by bawdy scenes. Father …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2013/06/cultural-globalization-michael-crummys-galore-and-fast-runner/

Jun 09

The State and Brazilian literature: A Retirada da Laguna

In the early 1990s, when I was doing fieldwork on the history of military terror in Brazil, an academic told me about his “projetos da gaveta.” I didn’t understand this term, which he explained referred to projects that one starts but neither completes nor abandons, hence the term “projects in the drawer.” I think that …

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Permanent link to this article: https://www.introtoglobalstudies.com/2013/06/the-state-and-brazilian-literature-a-retirada-da-laguna/

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